One In Eight Fibromyalgia Patients Use Medical Marijuana To Treat Symptoms

New Study Finds That 1 Out Of Every 8 Fibromyalgia Patients Use Medical Cannabis

A new Canadian study was just released which found that roughly 1 out of every 8 people suffering from fibromyalgia treat their symptoms with cannabis.

“That is not unusual behavior, in general, for people with chronic medical illnesses for which we don’t have great treatments,” said Dr. Igor Grant (according to Health News), who heads the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California and was not involved in the study. “People start looking around, they look for other types of remedies, because they need the help,” he told Reuters Health.

I know three people with fibromyalgia, and all three of them use medical marijuana. All three of them say it’s better than any other medicine they have used, although they will point out that they still supplement their cannabis use with some other meds, but not nearly as much as their doctors tell them they need. I’m far from a doctor or scientist, but that has been my experience. If you are a TWB reader suffering from fibromyalgia, how has medical cannabis helped you? Below is more information about cannabis and fibromyalgia, courtesy of our friends at NORML:

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology. The disease is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and multiple tender points in the neck, spine, shoulders and hips. An estimated 3 to 6 million Americans are afflicted by fibromyalgia, which is often poorly controlled by standard pain medications.

Fibromyalgia patients frequently self-report using cannabis therapeutically to treat symptoms of the disease,[1-2] and physicians — in instances where it is legal for them do so — often recommend the use of cannabis to treat musculoskeletal disorders.[3-4] To date however, there are few clinical trials assessing the use of cannabinoids to treat the disease.

Writing in the July 2006 issue of the journal Current Medical Research and Opinion, investigators at Germany’s University of Heidelberg evaluated the analgesic effects of oral THC in nine patients with fibromyalgia over a 3-month period. Subjects in the trial were administered daily doses of 2.5 to 15 mg of THC and received no other pain medication during the trial. Among those participants who completed the trial, all reported a significant reduction in daily recorded pain and electronically induced pain.[5]

A 2008 study published in The Journal of Pain reported that the administration of the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone significantly decreased pain in 40 subjects with fibromylagia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. “As nabilone improved symptoms and was well-tolerated, it may be a useful adjunct for pain management in fibromyalgia,” investigators concluded. [6] A separate 2010 trial performed at McGill University in Montreal reported that low doses of nabilone significantly improved sleep quality in patients diagnosed with the disease. [7]

Most recently, a 2011 observational, case-control trial reported that the use of cannabis is associated with beneficial effects on various symptoms of fibromyalgia, including the relief of pain and muscle stiffness. Investigators at the Institut de Recerca Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain, assessed the associated benefits of cannabis in patients with fibromyalgia compared with FM patients who did not use the substance. Twenty-eight users and non-users participated in the study.

Authors reported: “Patients used cannabis not only to alleviate pain but for almost all symptoms associated to FM, and no one reported worsening of symptoms following cannabis use. … Significant relief of pain, stiffness, relaxation, somnolence, and perception of well-being, evaluated by VAS (visual analogue scales) before and two hours after cannabis self-administration was observed.” Cannabis users in the study also reported higher overall mental health summary scores than did non-users. Investigators concluded: “The present results together with previous evidence seem to confirm the beneficial effects of cannabinoids on FM symptoms.”[8]
Previous clinical and preclinical trials have shown that both naturally occurring and endogenous cannabinoids hold analgesic qualities,[9-12] particularly in the treatment of pain resistant to conventional pain therapies. (Please see the ‘Chronic Pain‘ section of this book for further details.) As a result, some experts have suggested that cannabinoids are potentially applicable for the treatment of chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia,[13] and have theorized that the disease may be associated with an underlying clinical deficiency of the endocannabinoid system.[14]

REFERENCES

[1] Swift et al. 2005. Survey of Australians using cannabis for medical purposes. Harm Reduction Journal 4: 2-18.

[2] Ware et al. 2005. The medicinal use of cannabis in the UK: results of a nationwide survey. International Journal of Clinical Practice 59: 291-295.

[3] Dale Gieringer. 2001. Medical use of cannabis: experience in California. In: Grotenhermen and Russo (Eds).Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutic Potential. New York: Haworth Press: 153-170.

[4] Gorter et al. 2005. Medical use of cannabis in the Netherlands. Neurology64: 917-919.

[6] Skrabek et al. 2008. Nabilone for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia. The Journal of Pain 9: 164-173.

[9] Burns and Ineck. 2006. Cannabinoid analgesia as a potential new therapeutic option in the treatment of chronic pain. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 40: 251-260.

[10] David Secko. 2005. Analgesia through endogenous cannabinoids. CMAJ 173.

[12] Cox et al. 2007. Synergy between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat. European Journal of Pharmacology 567: 125-130.

[13] Lynch and Campbell. 2011. op. cit.

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