Missouri Veterans of Foreign Wars Endorse Amendment 2 for Medical Cannabis

Advocates for Missouri's Amendment 2 view the Veterans of Foreign Wars' endorsement among the most important.

As reported here, Missouri has three separate medical marijuana legalization measures on the ballot to be voted for on Nov. 6, 2018.

In a recent victory for the grassroots campaign for Amendment 2, following the endorsement from Missouri’s largest newspaper, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Missouri Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) have also come out in favor of Amendment 2, according to Campaign Consultant Jack Cardetti of New Approach Missouri.

“Veterans know that Amendment 2 is the right choice for Missouri because it says that doctors and patients should be in charge of medical decisions – not politicians and government bureaucrats,” said Cardetti, reported the Missouri Times.

Missouri has a veteran population of nearly half-a-million, half of whom are over the age of 55, making this VFW endorsement even more significant.

“Medical marijuana can be an important treatment option for veterans, which is why groups like Missouri VFW and veterans throughout the state support Amendment 2. Of the numerous endorsements, Amendment 2 has received, this one from Missouri veterans is really special,” said Cardetti.

In addition to the potential medicinal benefits for the veterans in need of medical marijuana, Amendment 2 could provide new business opportunities for veterans like Alice Mangan, who served in the Army on active duty from 1991 to 1996 and is prime candidate for MMJ due to a variety of ailments from which she suffers.

Missouri has a high rate of entrepreneurship among veterans, says Mangan, with over one veteran-owned business for every ten veterans.

The national VFW, in their October 2018 magazine, highlighted New Approach Missouri and Amendment 2 saying: “If approved, the legislation would make Missouri the only state to devote the proceeds from the sale of medical marijuana to assist veterans.”

Under Amendment 2, PTSD would be a qualifying condition under law, allowing state-licensed physicians to recommend it as a treatment option.

“We know veterans have been impacted by the opioid crisis in this country and that many of them are silently suffering from diseases like TBI, PTSD, and chronic pain,” said Cardetti.

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